Tuesday, October 2, 2018
09:00 – 17:30
CHOICE OF CONCURRENT ALL-DAY SEMINARS (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6 or S7)
Co-Chairs: Mary Ellen Macdonald, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada,
  Hal Siden, BC Children's Hospital, Canuck Place Children's Hospice, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Committee: Susan Cadell, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada,
  Franco Carnevale, McGill University; Le Phare, Enfants et familles, Montréal, QC, Canada

This Pediatrics “Rethinking” Seminar will examine how the construct ‘palliative’ matters in our clinical and research work in Pediatric Palliative Care. From a societal level, we will ask: How might current definitions and interpretations of the word “palliative” affect how care is conceived and delivered in child-focused settings? From a clinical level, we will ask: How might current definitions and interpretations of “palliative” affect how children & youth can access care and how care is delivered to them? In this seminar, we will confront our assumptions and practices, with the goal of resolving tensions, uncovering gaps and imagining future directions together.

09:00 – 10:30

Welcome and Introductions
Revisiting the Previous Seminar

Mary Ellen Macdonald and Franco Carnevale

Dimensions, Definitions and Dissensions in the History of ‘Palliative Care’

David Clark, University of Glasgow, Dumfries, Scotland, United Kingdom

Questions & Discussion

11:00 - 12:30

What is ‘Palliative’ Care, Clinically-speaking?
Exploring Myriad Models and Programs

John Lantos, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO, United States
Kimberley Widger, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Questions & Discussion

14:00 – 15:30

Examining the ‘Palliative’ Through a Clinical Lens

Dawn Davies, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario / Roger Neilson House, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Adam Rapoport, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada

Questions & Discussion

16:00 – 17:30

Examining the ‘Palliative’ Through a Public Health Lens:
How Might We Imagine PPC Differently?

Mary Ellen Macdonald

Foundational Speaker (TBC)

Questions & Discussion

Co-Chairs: Chris MacKinnon, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
Marc Hamel, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
Zeev Rosberger, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
Therese A. Rando, The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Loss, Warwick, RI, United States
Loss and trauma are inherent parts of dying, death, and bereavement. Unfortunately, caregivers often overfocus on loss and neglect both trauma and the unique phenomenon created when trauma and loss combine together, in which successful coping with either one can be compromised. The focus of this seminar is three-fold: To explicate the trauma and traumatic stress present in both anticipatory and post-death bereavement; to identify complications they create; and to outline strategies for addressing them so as to promote healthy mourning. Throughout, there is stress upon integrating thanatology and traumatology at the conceptual and practical levels.

09:00 – 10:30

Core Concepts of Trauma, Traumatic Stress, and Traumatic Bereavement

11:00 - 12:30

Presence of Trauma and Traumatic Stress in Post-Death Acute Grief and Mourning

14:00 – 15:30

Presence of Trauma and Traumatic Stress in Anticipatory Mourning

16:00 – 17:30

Selected Intervention Strategies Addressing Trauma and Traumatic Stress in Anticipatory and Post-Death Mourning

Organizers and Co-Chairs: Vasiliki Bitzas, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
Maryse Bouvette, Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada
David K. Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
In this pre-conference day participants will consider the ways that nurses can engage meaningfully and effectively with patients and families in palliative care. Invited speakers will present on specific communication challenges in palliative nursing, bring awareness to some unique needs of diverse patient populations, and reflect more broadly on care environments as moral communities that foster and constrain nurses’ relational practice.

09:00 – 10:30

Engaging in Family-Centered Communication

Elaine Wittenberg, California State University, Los Angeles, CA, United States

11:00 - 12:30

Nursing Relationships with LGBTQ Patients and Families

Kimberley D. Acquaviva, The George Washington University School of Nursing, Washington, DC, United States

14:00 – 15:30

The Moral Context of Nurses’ Relational Practice

Patricia (Paddy) Rodney, University of British Columbia School of Nursing, Vancouver, BC, Canada

16:00 – 17:30

Nursing in a Context of Neurologic Injury

Marianne Sofronas, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

Organizers and Co-Chairs: Anna Voeuk, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Leonie Herx, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
Bernard J. Lapointe, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

In cooperation with the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians

Most cases of moderate to severe pain in the palliative setting can be managed through traditional methods of treatment, including opioids and adjuvant medications. However, complex situations warrant consideration of other analgesic interventions or procedures to effectively treat pain – these have been described in the literature as a proposed Step 4 to the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder. Speakers in this session will review existing evidence and guidelines for innovative approaches to pain management required for more complex situations.

09:00 – 10:30

The Difficult Pain Syndrome

Discussant:

Eduardo Bruera, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States

PART 1
Interventional Modalities for Cancer Pain Management

Kenneth D. Candido, University of Illinois at Chicago; Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States

Low Dose Methadone as a Co-Analgesic

Eduardo Bruera, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States

11:00 – 12:30

PART 2
Old Drugs, New Approaches: Lidocaine

Philippa (Pippa) Hawley, BC Cancer Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Old Drugs, New Approaches: Ketamine

Mellar Davis, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, United States

Questions & Discussion

14:00 – 15:30

Taking Psychedelics Seriously

Ira Byock, Providence Institute for Human Caring, Torrance, CA, United States
Charles S. Grob, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, United States

16:00 – 17:30

Cannabis and Cannabinoids for Pain Management Overview and Update on Cannabis Use for Pain. Comments on Route of Administration and Different Formulations

Mark Ware, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

Cannabinoids for Cancer Pain: What’s the Buzz?s

Paul Daeninck, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada

Questions & Discussion

Co-Chairs: Rose DeAngelis,West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada
Hitesh Bhanabhai, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
Zelda Freitas, CIUSSS du Centre-Ouest-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Côte Saint-Luc, QC, Canada
In this all-day interactive seminar, participants will gain a better understanding of the differences between palliative care, end-of-life care and using a palliative approach. Presenters will clarify some of the myths about palliative care and misperceptions about pain and symptom management. Participants will experience the challenges of having difficult conversations and advanced care planning discussions, as well as practice some newly-learned creative methods to self-care. This session is for any health care professional, in any setting, who works with a population of people experiencing chronic and/or life limiting illness.

09:00 – 10:30

Introduction to Palliative Care

Hitesh Bhanabhai McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada

Integrating a Palliative Approach into Practice for Optimal Symptom Management

Rose DeAngelis, West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada

11:00 - 12:30

Self-Care & Loss from the Health Care Team’s Perspective

Sarah Tevyaw, West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

Having Difficult Conversations

Zelda Freitas, CIUSSS du Centre-Ouest-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Côte Saint-Luc, QC, Canada

Concepts and Misconceptions about Pain

Cory Ingram, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States

16:00 – 17:30

Initiating Advanced Care Planning Discussions

Tamara Sussman, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

Organizers and Co-Chairs: Suzanne O’Brien,Hope & Cope; The Council on Palliative Care, Montréal, QC, Canada; and Teresa Dellar, West Island Palliative Care Residence, Montréal, QC, Canada
Spend the day with us in dialogue with thought leaders, innovators, community practitioners, volunteers and clinicians who will explore the growing movement towards community mobilization, compassionate communities and broadening the conversation about end-of-life care. The day looks at international, national and local perspectives and programs, lessons learned, future challenges, and invites the audience to bring their own experience of community programs to actively engage with us in case studies and reflection.

09:00 – 10:30

Community Is a Verb

Ira Byock Providence Institute for Human Caring, Torrance, CA, United States

Death and Community in the UK

Ros Taylor, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kingdom

11:00 - 12:30

Advocacy and Change: What Is Happening at the Canadian Level?

Sharon Baxter, Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Ian Bos, Aberdeen Palliative Care Society, New Glasgow, NS, Canada
Dawn Cruchet, Madawaska Valley Hospice Palliative Care, Barry's Bay, ON, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

Bringing It Home: The Montréal Experience and Other Case Studies

Suzanne O’Brien, Hope & Cope; The Council on Palliative Care, Montréal, QC, Canada

16:00 - 17:30

Extending Our Reach: Community Mobilization/Advocacy

Teresa Dellar, West Island Palliative Care Residence, Montréal, QC, Canada

Organizers and Co-Chairs: Tom Hutchinson and Stephen Liben, McGill Programs in Whole Person Care, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada;
As a clinician, how can I bring my whole personhood to best care for my patients? What might a mindful medical practice that brings well-being to both patient and clinician look like?
Based on a 7-week undergraduate mindful medical practice course, participants will be actively engaged in structured learning activities such as listening exercises, dyad discussions, analyzing videos, narrative processes, guided awareness practices, and opportunities for individual reflection specifically relevant to improving skill and effectiveness in the clinician/patient relationship. You should complete the day having learned something useful for your own clinical work and come away with a sense of whether and how the course may be relevant in your own setting.

09:00 – 10:30

Attention and Awareness

11:00 - 12:30

Congruent Communication

14:00 – 15:30

Challenging Clinical Situations

16:00 - 17:30

Building Resilience

17:30 - 19:00


Join fellow participants over a glass of wine or refreshment of your choice and sample some of Montreal’s most delectable culinary treats. A great opportunity to reconnect with old friends and to meet new ones in a relaxing ambience. (Included in the registration fee)

19:30

What Mortality Can Teach Us About Living



Ira Byock, Founder/Chief Medical Officer, Providence Institute for Human Caring, Torrance, CA, United States

Dr. Byock is a leading palliative care physician, author, and public advocate for improving care through the end of life.

Congress participants are welcome to attend this free public lecture. However, since space is limited, please RSVP at www.palliativecare.ca/bourke